60 amp electrical service:

Most standard sized homes built prior to the 1960’s were built with a 60 amp electrical service.; This size was reasonable for the needs of living at the time. Homes today with this capacity usually have gas stoves, gas clothes dryers, and few electrical outlets in each room. Sixty amps would not be enough to service a home with the standard electrical amenities like: an electric stove, an electric oven, an electric air conditioner, an electric clothes dryer and so on. The problem with 60 amp electrical service lies with renewing your insurance policy. Insurance companies may terminate the policy or demand that there be an upgrade if you are on a current plan. 60 amp electrical services can become dangerous when people do things like run too many extension cords or install oversized fuses. It is important to have a certified electrician take a look at the distribution of wiring when upgrading amps or your home may not be any safer than before.

100 amp electrical service:

The main circuit breaker identifies the amperage capacity of the electrical panel.  There will be a number on the electrical panel telling you what the amp capacity is. For example, 100 or 150 could be listed beside the panel. 100 amp is the minimum allowed by today’s code. 150 amps, 200 amps, and 400 amps are among other standard available sizes.

Amps or Amperes:

A unit that measures the rate of electrical flow (electrical current).

Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter:

AFCIs are a newly-developed electrical device. They are designed to protect your home from fires that can be caused by arcing faults in your electrical wiring. Arcing faults usually occur when corroded, damaged or deteriorated wires and cords are present. Traditional circuit breakers respond to overloads in circuits while AFCIs respond specifically to unwanted arcing conditions. The AFCI will shut off the electricity if an arc fault occurs, will trip or short circuit when an overload occurs and reduce the chance of a fire. It is important to note that AFCIs diminish the effects of arcing faults but cannot prevent them entirely.

Circuit Breakers / Fuses:

Devices installed in the service panel of a home to limit the flow of electricity through a circuit. The breaker rating determines the maximum flow.

Circuit Extensions:

To extend or add-on to an existing circuit to provide an additional power source.

Code Corrections:

Procedure designed to eliminate wiring conditions that do not meet National Electrical Code requirements and safety conditions.

Distribution Equipment:

A device designed to provide electricity to multiple connections.

+ A
60 amp electrical service:

Most standard sized homes built prior to the 1960’s were built with a 60 amp electrical service.; This size was reasonable for the needs of living at the time. Homes today with this capacity usually have gas stoves, gas clothes dryers, and few electrical outlets in each room. Sixty amps would not be enough to service a home with the standard electrical amenities like: an electric stove, an electric oven, an electric air conditioner, an electric clothes dryer and so on. The problem with 60 amp electrical service lies with renewing your insurance policy. Insurance companies may terminate the policy or demand that there be an upgrade if you are on a current plan. 60 amp electrical services can become dangerous when people do things like run too many extension cords or install oversized fuses. It is important to have a certified electrician take a look at the distribution of wiring when upgrading amps or your home may not be any safer than before.

100 amp electrical service:

The main circuit breaker identifies the amperage capacity of the electrical panel.  There will be a number on the electrical panel telling you what the amp capacity is. For example, 100 or 150 could be listed beside the panel. 100 amp is the minimum allowed by today’s code. 150 amps, 200 amps, and 400 amps are among other standard available sizes.

Amps or Amperes:

A unit that measures the rate of electrical flow (electrical current).

Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter:

AFCIs are a newly-developed electrical device. They are designed to protect your home from fires that can be caused by arcing faults in your electrical wiring. Arcing faults usually occur when corroded, damaged or deteriorated wires and cords are present. Traditional circuit breakers respond to overloads in circuits while AFCIs respond specifically to unwanted arcing conditions. The AFCI will shut off the electricity if an arc fault occurs, will trip or short circuit when an overload occurs and reduce the chance of a fire. It is important to note that AFCIs diminish the effects of arcing faults but cannot prevent them entirely.

+ B
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Circuit Breakers / Fuses:

Devices installed in the service panel of a home to limit the flow of electricity through a circuit. The breaker rating determines the maximum flow.

Circuit Extensions:

To extend or add-on to an existing circuit to provide an additional power source.

Code Corrections:

Procedure designed to eliminate wiring conditions that do not meet National Electrical Code requirements and safety conditions.

+ D
Distribution Equipment:

A device designed to provide electricity to multiple connections.

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